Here's one reason why America's racial wealth gap persists across generations

White adults are more than twice as likely as Black and Latino households to get sizable financial help from parents or other elders. That's according to a new poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Dorothy Brown, a tax law professor at Georgetown University, wishes more white families would talk about these intergenerational benefits.

"Because you have Black Americans who are doing everything they were told is right and not getting ahead," she says. "And they're scratching their heads wondering, 'How come I'm not doing better than I am? How come I'm not doing better than the guy in the cubicle next to me?' "

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Editorial: State must take action on housing needs

If there’s one lesson to take from the past two legislative cycles, it’s that Connecticut’s suburbs aren’t going to change unless they’re pushed.

In 2021, after weeks of debate, the General Assembly passed a law legalizing accessory dwelling units, otherwise known as granny pods or ADUs, anywhere single-family homes are allowed. These are a separate home on a piece of property, either attached or detached, that are viewed by experts as a good way to improve housing availability without affecting the character of a street. It was seen as a good first step in a much larger problem.

But the law came with an out clause. Communities had two years to opt against allowing the construction of ADUs, and many towns are taking advantage of that option. The result is little change at all.

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Vast New Study Shows a Key to Reducing Poverty

For poor children, living in an area where people have more friendships that cut across class lines significantly increases how much they earn in adulthood, the new research found.

The study, published Monday in Nature, analyzed the Facebook friendships of 72 million people, amounting to 84 percent of U.S. adults aged 25 to 44.

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Editorial: Housing costs out of reach for too many

What is driving inflation?

The most visible sign is gas prices, which are posted in giant numbers outside stations in every corner of the state. It’s easy to see when prices go up because it’s so clearly in your face. Fortunately for drivers, gas prices have dropped significantly in the past few weeks from their early summer highs.

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Low-income housing boosts CT’s local real estate values

Planning and zoning meetings across Connecticut have been punctuated for decades with public comments to the effect that low-income housing will, should the commission dare allow for the introduction of such housing to their town, lower housing values of incumbent homeowners. The argument might be summarized that low-income housing development, by its very proximity to existing homes, reduces the sale value of this homes, thereby imposing, in effect, an additional property tax on the incumbents.

My analysis of the data demonstrates otherwise.

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Connecticut's pilot housing program for families with young children is expanding

A first-in-the-nation program that connects families with young children to affordable housing in Connecticut is growing.

The Head Start on Housing program is administering an additional 35 state-funded housing vouchers for low-income families enrolled in Head Start, a federally funded preschool program that promotes school readiness for children up to age 5.

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Housing is a human right

In 1944 President Franklin D. Roosevelt declared that the U.S. had a “Second Bill of Rights”, including the right to a decent home. It wasn’t for another four years that the right to adequate housing was accepted under the Human Rights Law (as part of the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights). Yet leaders in this country continue to treat housing as a commodity rather than a necessity. When we acknowledge housing as a human right, we can begin to commit funding to address the affordability crisis.

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As affordable housing deadline approaches, Connecticut towns’ response a mix of pushback and innovation — and one allegation of perpetuating segregation

Facing a state-mandated deadline of Wednesday, Connecticut communities this spring have been wrapping up work on their official plans to provide more affordable housing — even though many caution that the state’s goal isn’t practical.

As of May 23, fewer than 50 of Connecticut’s 169 municipalities had filed plans, according to the state Office of Policy and Management.

Although the state wants each community to have at least 10% of its housing qualify as affordable, the most common theme in the various housing plans is that conditions vary widely from one town to another.

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Why advocates say CT is experiencing ‘housing crisis’

Advocates believe Connecticut is in the midst of a housing crisis. They say the cost of housing at all levels is pricing out renters and potential owners who only a short time ago could afford their homes.

People are forced to move, these advocates say, because the apartment they could afford two years ago has now become far too expensive. For the first time in years, this has increased housing instability and homelessness in Connecticut.

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Families Stranded As Rental Vouchers Expire

After a four-year desperate search for a ticket out of an abusive household, Ella received one in the form a housing rental-voucher. She shed tears of relief — until she tried to find a landlord who would agree to accept it.

Ella’s story reflects a broader challenge for a growing number of low-income tenants lucky enough to make it through long waitlists to obtain a federal Section 8 rental subsidy: Translating the subsidy into an actual home, because of landlords reluctant to participate in the program in a tight housing market.

The number of vouchers that expire before they can be used has shot up over the past two years.

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