Gathering the Facts About How Housing Segregation Hurts Chicago

Gathering the Facts About How Housing Segregation Hurts Chicago, Oscar Perry Abello, Next City, June 13, 2016, available here

What they've found is that middle-class Chicago neighborhoods that are made up mostly of black and Latino residents tend to be surrounded by black and Latino neighborhoods that are lower-income, while the city’s mostly white and middle-class neighborhoods tend to be surrounded by neighborhoods that are wealthier and mostly white. It effectively means there are two economic ladders in Chicago, one for people with white skin and one for everyone else.

“You could have a white, middle-class person on the North Side with similar income to a black, middle-class person on the South Side and while their income may be comparable, their experience living in this city and the wealth that they are able to create is incredibly different,” Novara explains.

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